Category Archives: Advanced

LEGO Ukulele

After planning, gathering the parts, and designing this ukulele, I was finally able to start  build this LEGO ukulele.

Here is the ukulele before I glued the top on.  As you can see in the picture, I followed the traditional building method and installed bracing on the top and back.

This is the completed ukulele with Strings.

Any idea why I used these shirts for this picture?

I hired a new setup technician to help me adjust the string action.

 

Here is a video about the building of the LEGO ukulele.  Towards the end there is a playing demo.

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Backpacker Guitar

Here are some helps and hints to make your own Backpacker Guitar.  This project takes some knowledge and skill, so I wouldn’t recommend it as a first instrument building project.

Parts and supplies:

  • 6 tuners
  • Compass inlay
  • 2 inches of bass fretwire (for the zero nut)
  • Enough guitar fretwire for 15 frets
  • 2 strap buttons
  • Angled aluminum and aluminum tube for the bridge
  • Material for the string turnaround
  • Metal rivets (to make string ferrules for the ball ends)
  • A set of “extra light” acoustic guitar strings
  • Solid hardwood at least 24 inches long, 3.5 inches wide, and 1 inch thick.
  • Wood at least 9.5 inches long, 3.5 inches wide, and 1/8 inch thick (for the back)

The rectangular body section is 9.75 by 3.5 inches.  After the 9.75 inches, it curves in towards the neck.

Making the turnaround is very important.  I modified the turnaround so that each of the strings turn independently on its own roller.  That is not shown in the video.  The string spacing (from string 1 to string 6) at the bridge and turnaround is 52 mm.  The string spacing at the zero fret is 36 mm.

I recommend that you print out the fret template, and combine it with the dimensions of the body.  The tines of the of the body are around .5 inch wide.

 

 

Download and print the fretboard below:

Backpacker_Guitar_22inch_fretboard

 

Walking Stick One String Bass

This is a walking stick for bassists that have a need to ramble.

Watch the video below to watch the major parts of the building process.

If you have some experience with woodwork and instrument building, here are some helps for making your own.

List of materials:

  • Sturdy hardwood at least 1″ by 1.5″ by 44″  (I used cherry wood)
  • Bass tuning machine
  • Rubber tip
  • Cane handle
  • “D” or “G” bass string
  • Medium sized eye screw
  • Short piece of bass fretwire (for the zero fret nut)
  • Few feet of guitar fretwire (for the rest of the frets)
  • Angled aluminum
  • Plastic tube
  • Piezo rod
  • Strat-style jack plate
  • 1/4″ mono jack
  • Miscellaneous screws

Below is the printable template for the fretboard. The scale length is 31 inches.  The outside edge of the template can be used for shaping the main shape of the shaft.  Then, it is up the builder to long how long the top and bottom need to be extended for the tuner, tip, output jack, and handle.

Walking Stick One String Bass Fretboard (31 inch scale length)

If all of this hasn’t scared you off yet, then good luck with your project.  This isn’t a great “first instrument” project, but there are a few of those in my “Free Plans” section.

 

Tennis Racquet Ukulele

Difficulty:  Advanced

Cost:  $$

I made a tennis racquet ukulele before, but this time I wanted to do a few thing differently.  I wanted to have a wooden top and back, and I wanted to widen the neck enough to use a normal sized fretboard.

Here is the racquet before the strings were removed.

Goodbye strings!

I planed down the body and the handle.

To make the neck wide enough for the fretboard, I glued cherry wood pieces to the side.

Gluing on the basswood top and fretboard.  It has a tenor (17″) scale length.

 

After gluing on the bridge, I applied a few coats of Tru-Oil.

Check out the beautiful lamination of this racquet.

With the tuners installed, this uke is ready for strings.

I used a string retainer since this ukulele doesn’t have an angled headstock.

Here is the ukulele compared with Tennis Racquet Banjo ukulele that I made a few years ago.

 

Check out the demo video of the tennis racquet ukulele.

Backpacker Travel Ukulele

Difficulty:  Advanced

Cost:  $$

If you follow this website, you know that my Travel Ukulele plans are popular.  This ukulele is a variation of that design.

 

I took my travel ukulele design and cut off the back portion. I also omitted the pickup and jack. Requiring an amp definitely make a ukulele less portable. Not having the pickup also meant that I could start out with a piece of wood only .75″ instead of the normal 1″.  This uke has a concert scale length (15″) but the overall length is just 17.5″.

Because I took out the pickup, I decided to add a thin piece of wood to the back to help out with the resonance.

I stamped my last name into the back.

The main wood is maple and the back piece is basswood.

Even after applying a few coats of Tru-Oil and adding strings, this ukulele weighs just 11 ounces.

This uke even has a working compass inlayed into the neck.

This ukulele would be great to throw in a backpack, keep in a car, or stow in some luggage.

If you want to use a strap, there are strap pegs at the back and where the headstock would normally be.

This ukulele is heading on an epic trek.  Check out Her Odyssey to follow along with the journey.

Video demo time!

Headless Stratocaster Ukulele

Difficulty: Advanced 

Cost: $$$

A few years ago I made a travel ukulele with features similar to this one, but this one has a Stratocaster style body.  This has a tenor scale length (17″) and an overall length of just 20 inches.

The body is maple, and the fretboard is walnut.  Before painting, I made sure that all of the hardware fits.

The body is taped off and it’s ready for spraying.

Prime time!

Painting the body blue.

En garde!  After the blue paint came the matte clear coat.

I put a low g on it.  I put a section of plastic pipe at the back to cut down on the friction off the strings turning back towards the tuners.

The tuners are mounted to two additional pieces on wood on the back. The output jack is a Stratocaster jack plate mounted upside down.

I love how this turned out.  It’s pretty and it sounds great plugged into an amp.

Check out the demo video!

Eastman Mandocello Repair

A friend brought this mandocello in rough shape. He had purchased it at an estate sale in its damaged condition.

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It had a significant crack on the side.

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Before I started the glue job, I loosened the strings a lot so they would not add extra stress to the joint.

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I got a few syringes on eBay and filled them with glue.

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I carefully injected glue into the cracks.

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I used some DIY spool clamps that I made last year to keep the joint together.

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After the glue dried, I sprayed two coat of nitrocellulose lacquer over the joint to seal everything up.

Even though this mandocello got a battle scar, it is still a gorgeous instrument.
  

 

This was my first chance to play a mandocello.  They are really cool sounding instrument that would be a great addition to any folk ensemble.