Monthly Archives: February 2014

Film Can Strummer

Difficulty: Intermediate

Cost: $

Strummers (Strumsticks, stick dulcimers)  are very easy to play and super fun to build.  This is a smaller strummer with a 17 inch scale length.  I tune it Low G, D, G.  I used an old film can, but any type of wooden, plastic, metal, or even sturdy paper would work for the body.  By printing out the fret guide and watching video a few times, you should be able to make a cool instrument.  Let me know if you have any questions by leaving a comment.

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Parts needed:

  • .75 by 1.5 by 25.5 inch wood (for neck)
  • .25 by 1.5 by 10 inch wood (for fretboard)
  • Wooden or metal box
  • 3-on-a-plate tuners
  • Assorted small screw.
  • 1.5 inches angled aluminum or steel (for tailpiece)
  • Small piece of wood for bridge
  • 20 inches of fretwire
  • 3 thin, metal guitar strings

Printable fret guides:

(Make sure that you print these at 100% size)

8.5 by 11 paper

A4 paper

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Don’t use the 1st, 3rd, 6th, 8th, or 13th frets.

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Learn how to build this!

 

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Video Length Survey

 

Most of my YouTube videos are around 1 minute long.   I use them to highlight the major features of the instruments that I make. But some people might enjoy seeing more of the build process.  Let me know what you think.

Electric Ukulele (Free Plans)

Difficulty: Advanced

Cost: $$

I’ve made quite a few solid body electric ukuleles.  One of the most common questions about them is:  Can you make plans for them??

My answer (until today) was:  Well,  they are complicated enough that it is hard to distill the process into a step-by-step plan.

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Some of my electric ukuleles.  Which one is your favorite?

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After a lot of planning and thinking,   I can finally release the plans to this electric ukulele.  I tried to make the design as simple as possible.  This ukulele can be made without a router, and it doesn’t have an angled headstock.  The slot in the headstock provides the needed downward string angle.  I opted to not have an onboard volume control.   The volume is controlled on the the amplifier.

These plans, just like my other ones, can be modified to suit individual tastes.  Some fun alterations to try would be having a different body shape, or adding volume control.

DOWNLOAD PLANS

After you build your own, share your creation with me.

Learn more about the build process:

February 2014 Vote: What should I build?

Want to see something else?  Let me know.